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Croatia Travel Guide

Croatia Travel Guide: Dubrovnik

Croatia extends from the foothills of the Julian Alps in the north-west and the Pannonian Plain in the east, over the Dinara mountain range in its central region, to the Adriatic coast in the south.
After more than a decade of civil and ethnic unrest, Croatia is once again emerging as an attractive tourist destination. With its magnificent coastline, 1,185 islands, islets and reefs, Roman ruins and
picturesque medieval villages, it is fast becoming a rival to the magical Greek islands - alluring for lovers of fun, sun, local colour, great food and a little history.

After centuries of fighting for independence, and being sliced and diced geographically to suit political and ethnic divisions, Croatia has ended up arc-shaped. Its long Adriatic coastline forms the western leg, tapering to the unique ancient seaport of Dubrovnik in the south, while the land between the rivers Drava and Sava form the northern section. The capital, Zagreb, a typical central European metropolis, combining elegant nineteenth-century architecture with plenty of cultural diversions and a vibrant café scene, sits in-between.

At the northern end of the Adriatic coast, the peninsula of Istria contains many of the country's most developed resorts, with old Venetian towns like Rovinj rubbing shoulders with the raffish port of Pula.

Further south lies Dalmatia, a dramatic, mountain-fringed stretch of coastline studded with islands. Dalmatia's main towns are Zadar, an Italianate peninsula town, and Split, an ancient Roman settlement and modern port which provides a jumping-off point to a series of enchanting islands. It's on Brac, Hvar, Vis and Korcula that you'll find the best of the beaches, as well as some lively fishing villages. South of Split lies the medieval walled city of Dubrovnik, site of an important festival in the summer and a magical place to be, whatever the season.

The most prominent feature of Croatia's tourist industry is its Dalmatian coastline, which is indented with rocky cliffs, peninsulas and small inlets. Numerous good quality hotels and marinas have been resurrected or constructed in the past few years, and the Croatian province is once again beginning to enjoy a tourist boom reminiscent of its heyday in the 1930s. There is a special atmosphere to Croatian towns and villages, many of which are built on the sites of ancient Greek settlements dating from the 4th century BC. This, coupled with a welcoming and determined population, Mediterranean climate, scenic beauty and lush vegetation, is aiding Croatia's rise from the ashes of war into one of the world's tourist hot spots.

The Adriatic Coast, with its 1185 islands, islets and reefs is considered to be one of the most impressive coastlines in Europe. Finding a satisfactory way to explore this ravishing two thousand kilometers coastline in one holiday is impossible! Croatia is blessed with truly most glorious coastline which has miraculously escaped the over-development of some other Mediterranean holiday destinations.

Croatia Travel Guide

Croatia Travel Guide: Hvar

Croatia extends from the foothills of the Julian Alps in the north-west and the Pannonian Plain in the east, over the Dinara mountain range in its central region, to the Adriatic coast in the south.
After more than a decade of civil and ethnic unrest, Croatia is once again emerging as an attractive tourist destination. With its magnificent coastline, 1,185 islands, islets and reefs, Roman ruins and
picturesque medieval villages, it is fast becoming a rival to the magical Greek islands - alluring for lovers of fun, sun, local colour, great food and a little history.

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Dubrovnik Travel Guide

Dubrovnik:Panorama

Despite being nearly devastated during Yugoslavia's civil war in the early 90s, Dubrovnik, on Croatia's beautiful Dalmatian coast, has emerged, re-built, as a stunning holiday destination. A holiday in Dubrovnik offers not only magnificent vistas and beaches, washed by turquoise waters, but
also a compact, picturesque medieval core, pedestrianized and surrounded by its original city walls, which captures the imagination of its myriad visitors.

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Hvar Travel Guide

Hvar: Main Square

Hvar is the biggest and the most important town on the island of Hvar - centre of the island's tourism. It is a town of a unique cultural and historical heritage but also an important tourist resort with a centuries-old tradition in tourism.The Town Square in Hvar is among the most beautiful and the largest in Croatia. The square measures 4500 square meters, and the town has developed around this square, starting north of the square in the 13th century and then circling to the south of the square in the 15th century.

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Bourgas Travel Guide

Museums and Galleries

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Makarska Travel Guide

Makarska Night View

The city of Makarska grew around a natural harbor protected by a picturesque peninsula of Sveti Petar (St. Peter) and the cape Osejava. It is the only harbor of this kind between the mouth of the Cetina and Neretva rivers. In the past it provided protection and safe harbor during stormy weather to sailors, pirates and merchants, and nowadays it does the same for yachts, sailing boats and tourist ships. This contributed to its development into a trading port, especially during the Ottoman and Venetian occupation.

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